Tiny House Essay Contest Entry

We’re living through a frightful era; one in which food rots in pantries of privilege while less fortunate children stir hungrily in their restless sleep. It’s an age of man-made scarcity. In the so-called developed countries of the world, people willingly sacrifice their autonomy at the alter of consumerism. Such people have long since forgotten how to cultivate sustenance and have instead turned to cheap, often genetically modified, industrial poison as a source of nourishment. They squander their futures on grotesque McMansions bought with credit from predatory lenders and isolate themselves in highly atomized gated communities. Here the hapless consumers obsess over frivolous products and entertainment, expertly marketed by cunning spin doctors in corporate boardrooms, and distract themselves from the horrendous faraway resource wars which enable their hollow lifestyles. In these suburban bastions of American consumerism, where humanitarian dissent is ridiculed and conformity celebrated, very little is sustainable, much less moral. 

I, for one, intend to bow out of this cruelly comical rat-race and rediscover a more simple, fulfilling means of survival. It’s not that I plan on retreating from our imperfect world; I hope to reform it. Acquiring a tiny house and educating myself and others about the benefits of alternative living would be a fitting first step in this process. I’m weary of reading longingly of the tiny house movement. I want to finally join its ranks and spread its gospel. The time for complaint has passed. We have arrived at a crisis point. Environmental degradation, homelessness, hunger and a plethora of other manufactured global problems demand immediate action and innovative solutions. Engaging in sustainable, tiny living won’t just clear my conscience and improve my life personally; it will substantively contribute to a peaceful grassroots revolution already underway. It’s a revolution that will ultimately reshape our world for the better.   
The late Robert Hart, the indomitable father of the modern food forest movement, once said that problems of hunger and resulting illness could be solved, “if only the know-how could be equalled by the will-to-serve.” I am strong-willed in this regard.
  

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One thought on “Tiny House Essay Contest Entry”

  1. Reblogged this on Intuitive Naturalism and commented:
    Well said!

    “The time for complaint has passed. We have arrived at a crisis point. Environmental degradation, homelessness, hunger and a plethora of other manufactured global problems demand immediate action and innovative solutions.”

    Like

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